Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Red Spider Lily | Lycoris radiata

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Fall Flowering Amaryllis







The earliest reference I have found for the red spider lily growing outside it's native environment, so far, is Camden Park, Australia. Now, whether it was growing in Australia before the landing of the HMS Endeavour at Botany Bay on April 29 1770 is the question

It is believed to have been grown in Japan prior to the 19th Century.  It has been suggested that they were introduced into Japan from China along with rice cultivation

In the United States Lavinia Cole Roberts is credited with sharing this beautiful bulb with other gardeners throughout the warm southern states. Lavina was the niece of Captain William Roberts. He gave her three bulbs offered to him on an expedition in 1854. Lavina's home and garden is located in New Bern, North Carolina. Details here.


Below is one of the first botanical prints I could find. It is from the publication, The Botanist Repository, published by Henry Charles Andrews in 1801. Andrews, through his marriage, was affiliated with the firm, The Vineyard Nursery located in Hammersmith, London. 



The second botanical print I have found, in chronological order, is the 1811 print from the Stuttgart Palace Garden by artist and publisher, Johann Simon von Kerner (1755-1830).

Kerner, J.S.,
Hortus sempervirens, vol. 29: t. 344
 (1811)
Source: Plant Illustration





The 1822 botanical art below is a print published in the Botanical Register. This time the artist is M. Hart. I have not been able to locate additional information on M. Hart but there were two botanical "Hart" artists in this area, the other artist was I.J. Hart, James McDougal Hart (1828 – 1901)). The Botanical Register, subsequently known as Edwards' Botanical Register, was an illustrated horticultural magazine that ran from 1815 to 1847. The Botanical Register was started by the illustrator Sydenham Edwards. After Edwards death, James Ridgway became publisher. Ridgway issued nine volumes between 1820 and 1828.
M. Hart
Edwards' Botanical Register
 (1822)
Source: Plant Illustration








The last botanical print is by artist, Louis Severeyns.
Lycoris radiate (L’Herit.)
La Belgigue horticole, journaldes jardins et des vergers,
 vol. 10 (1860), Van Houtte, Louis (Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker)
Louis Severeyns, published in Belgium






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