Thursday, March 23, 2017

Iris

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Last year I started a chart with my Irises, including color, height, and date of bloom. I am curious how this year will compare to last year. Week 1 begins.

What to Plant?
I will be creating a graph for my irises with three important characteristics (1)The initial time sequences of blooms  (2) height, and (3) color family. Iris 'Grain Exchange' was the first to bloom. It is about 38" in height and it is in the yellow color family.  This information, in a graphic form, is especially helpful when you want to create a newly designed bed from scratch. If you have several iris varieties, and would like to include in your garden journal a similar graphic, contact me and I can help you create a chart. It is quite easy.  I am in zone 7-8. 

Irises: Arranged in the chart by first to bloom (x), 
and height (y). 
Each iris will have a bar representing it's color.


I enjoy trying different artistic affects with the irises. Their ruffles, coloration, and shadows lend themselves to experimentation with various flourishes. Enjoy.








Iris Grain Exchange




















































Iris orientalis 
Coming soon!

Louisiana Iris
Coming soon!








































Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Greetings, Springtime

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These Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) look as though they are waving to all the passers-by along a boulevard in Arizona.



Seriously.








Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Sunday, March 19, 2017

March Means Fresh Asparagus and Radish in the Garden

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Asparagus with Garlic Butter
Every March I look forward to the appearance of the first stalk of asparagus.  Our family says my asparagus is the best they have ever tasted even without all the flourishes.  The recipe below is simple, delicious, and requires ingredients I generally have on hand.

Ingredients:

2 bunches
Asparagus, trimmed of woody ends (thick spears)
4 Tbsp.
2 cloves
To taste

Butter
Garlic cloves
Salt and pepper
Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Directions:


Bring a pan of water to a boil. Drop the asparagus in and cook for two minutes. Plunge into ice water bath and then drain.
Melt the butter in a large frying pan over medium heat, add the garlic and cook for one minute, until fragrant.
Add the asparagus to the pan. Toss gently, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Plate and add freshly grated parmesan cheese. Serves 4.





Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Thursday, March 2, 2017

Folklore

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"Mane-like" snow covered yucca







Moondog

















Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Historically Significant Gardens | Monticello

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Perusing through statistics for a blog I have about genealogical pursuits a significant number stood out. People were very interested in Thomas Jefferson's family, more so than any of the other Presidents genealogy I have researched and posted. 

In 1998 we took a family trip to see Williamsburg, Mt. Vernon, and Monticello. What captured our curiosity was not only the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains but the significant difference in the philosophical style of gardening between Washington and Jefferson. Jefferson sited Monticello at the top of the mountain, more for a view than a productive farm. Mt. Vernon was a working farm, not just subsistence but to bring in additional monies. Included were smoke houses and working quarters, adjacent to it's ideal location on the Potomac to provide irrigation and shipping.


Gardening + History

A pleasant notification greeted me last week from Margaret Roach's blog, A Way to Garden. She was hosting, Peggy Cornett, Historic Gardener and Curator of Plants at Jefferson’s former home, and they were discussing lettuces and beans of the Jefferson varietyGardening plus history is my kind of equation. So, to get an early start on the President's Day Festivities I hope you visit her site and celebrate the knowledge she shares about his gardening.

President's Day
Some of my earliest memories of cold days in January were helping my Grandmother, a second grade teacher, cut out construction paper silhouettes of the Presidents for her bulletin boards. I would usually trace and she would cut. I think Thomas Jefferson had a braid with a bow, along with that patrician nose that defined his countenance. 


His Calender and Journal
Thomas Jefferson's Garden Journal (or manuscript) is available at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston. It includes notes from his family's garden at Shadwell. He lists scarlet beans as one of the seeds included in their plantings. We planted scarlet runner beans this morning. I know it is too early but last year we planted them late and only had a few blooms before the heat of the summer dried it's marathoning spirit. 


A Favorite Coffee Table Book
One of my favorite books is Jefferson's Monticello by William Howard Adams. There are photographs of some of the ingeniously designed, seven-day calendar clock and polygraph along with sketches of garden designs and the important people responsible for maintaining the estate.

What stuck with me the most about Monticello was the air seemed to be more pure than anywhere I have ever been and the view would take your breath away.

So, here is the most visited post from my genealogy blog:

Presidential Genealogy | 3 | Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)


$Brick Walls, Charts, Critical Analysis, Family Stories, Genealogical Writing, Maps, Object Lessons,
 Research Methods and Tips


Descendants of Thomas Jefferson

1   Thomas Jefferson 1675 - b: Abt. 1675
.. +Mary Field 1675 - b: Abt. 1675
...... 2   Peter Jefferson 1707/08 - b: February 29, 1707/08 in Chesterfield County, Virginia
........... +Jane Randolph 1720/21 - 1776 b: February 09, 1720/21 in Shadwell, 
Tower Hamlets, London, d: March 31, 1776

.............. 3   Thomas Jefferson 1743 - 1826 b: April 13, 1743 in Shadwell, Virginia d: July 04, 1826 in 
Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S./College of William and Mary
.................. +Martha Wayles d: in The Forest (her father's plantation)
...................... 4   Martha Washington Jefferson 1772 - b: September 27, 1772
.......................... +Thomas Mann Randolph 1770 - b: Abt. 1770
.............................. 5   Eleanora Wayles Randolph 1800 - b: Abt. 1800
.................................. +Joseph Coolidge
...................................... 6   Thomas Jefferson Coolidge 1831 - b: 1831
.......................................... +Mehitable Sullivan Appleton
............................................... 7   Marion Appleton Coolidge
............................................... 7   Eleanora Randolph Coolidge
............................................... 7   Sarah Lawrence Coolidge
............................................... 7   Thomas Jefferson Coolidge
...................... 4   Jane Randolph Jefferson
...................... 4   Peter Jefferson
...................... 4   Mary "Polly" Jefferson
...................... 4   Lucy Elizabeth Jefferson
.............. 3   Jane Jefferson 1745 - b: Abt. 1745
.............. 3   Mary Jefferson 1741 - b: 1741
.............. 3   Elizabeth Jefferson 1744 - b: 1744
.............. 3   Martha Jefferson 1745 - b: Abt. 1745
.............. 3   Peter Field Jefferson 1745 - b: Abt. 1745
.............. 3   Peter Thomas Jefferson 1745 - b: Abt. 1745
.............. 3   Lucy Jefferson 1752 - b: October 10, 1752
.................. +Charles Lilburn Lewis 1747 - b: 1747

Peter Jefferson (February 29, 1708 – August 17, 1757) was the father of
 US President Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826). A surveyor and cartographer, his Fry-Jefferson Map of 1751
 accurately depicted the Allegheny Mountains for the first time and showed the route of
 "The Great Road from the Yadkin River through Virginia to Philadelphia distant 455 Miles" —
 what would later come to be known as the Great Wagon Road.


Saturday, January 21, 2017

Boxwood | Buxus

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Boxwood is used for topiaries, and framing -- herb gardens, a perennial border, or a garden maze.  




Parkwood, Toronto, Canada

Sheridan Nursery was owned by Howard Burlingham Dunington-Grubb and Lorrie Alfreda Dunington-Grubb. They crossbred various boxwoods to provide a hardy boxwood for the Toronto, Canada climate. The Dunington-Grubbs sometimes shared projects with the renowned Edwardian landscape architect, Thomas H. Mawson. 
'Green Gem' boxwood was developed at the Sheridan Nursery and tolerates the cold temperatures of zone 4.


Table 1: Boxwood Cultivars


American boxwood B. sempervirens  'Arborescens'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Agram’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Alyce’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Anderson’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Angustifolia’
Boxwood B x  ‘Antzam’ Antarctica
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Appalachian Pyramid’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Arabeske’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Arborescens’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Argentea’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Argenteo-variegata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Asheville’
Boxwood B x  ‘Bailey’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Belvedere’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Bentley Blue’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Blauer Heinz’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Broman’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Bullata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Clembrook’
Kingsville boxwood (Little leaf or Japanese boxwood) B. microphylla  ‘Compacta’ also Henry Hohman's 'Kingsville Dwarf' (bonsai), Kingsville, MD nursery
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘David’s Gold’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Dee Runk’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Denmark’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Edgar Anderson’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Elegantissima’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Elizabeth H. Inglis’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. koreana  ‘Escles’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fastigiata’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Faulkner’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fiesta’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Filigree’ or ‘Franklin’s Gem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fleur de Lys’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Franklin’s Gem’ or ‘Filigree’
Boxwood B x  ‘Garrisoni’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Glauca’
Boxwood B x  ‘Glencoe’ Chicagoland Green
Boxwood B x  ‘Goddard College’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Golden Dream’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Golden Triumph’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Graham Blandy’  
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Grand Rapids’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Grebor’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Green Beauty’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Green Gem’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Ice’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Green Jade’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Mound’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Mountain’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Green Pillow’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Green Pillow’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Green Prince’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Green Tower’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Velvet’   
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Gregem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Haller’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Handsworthiensis’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Handsworthii’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Harry Logan’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Helen Whiting’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Henry Shaw’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Hermann von Schrenk’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Herrenhausen’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Hollandia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Jack Randolph’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Jensen’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Jim Stauffer’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Joe Gable’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘John Baldwin’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Julia Jane’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Justin Brouwers’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Kingsville Dwarf’ also 'Compacta'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Lace’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Langley Beauty’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia Macrophylla’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia Maculata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Lawson’s Golden’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Liberty’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Marginata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Maryland’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Memorial’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Meyers’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Morris Dwarf’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Morris Midget’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Mount Bruno’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Myosotidifolia’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Nana’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Nela Park’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Nish’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Northern Emerald’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Notata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ohio’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Paramus’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Parasol’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pendula’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Pincushion’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pioneer’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ponteyi’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pride of Rochester’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Prostrata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pullman’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pyamidalis’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pyramidalis Hardwickensis’
Harland's boxwood B. harlandii  ‘Richard’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Rococco’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rosmarinifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rotundifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rungeana’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ruth Randolph’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Salicifolia’
Boxwood B x  ‘Sanders Dwarf’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Schmidt’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Sentinelle’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Shandy Hall’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Silver Beauty’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Staygreen’ aka ‘Sunburst'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Sunburst' or ‘Staygreen’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Sunnyside’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Tall Boy’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Tide Hill’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Trompenburg’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Truetree’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Undulifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Valentine’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Vardar Valley'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Verdant Hills’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Waterfall’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  ‘We Willie’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Welleri’
Boxwood B x  ‘Willowwood’
Boxwood B x  ‘Wilson’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Winter Beauty’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Winter Gem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens var. insularis  ‘Wintergreen’
Boxwood B x  'Balearica 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  'Bert Chandler’
Boxwood B x  'Bodinieri
Boxwood B x  'Conroe' '
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens 'Myrtifolia’
Boxwood B x  'North Star'
Harland's boxwood B. harlandii
Henry's Boxwood B. henryi
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens
Chinese boxwood B. sinica 
Himalayan box B. wallichiana




Collections of boxwood can be found at the following:
National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

JC Raulston Arboretum
Royal Horticulture Society
Middleton Place in Charleston, visited by André Michaux in 1786

Society
The American Boxwood Society

Growers
Saunders Brothers

Additional Resources:
Boxwood Handbook: A Practical Guide to Knowing and Growing Boxwood (3rd Edition) by Lynn R. Batdorf







Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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