Saturday, January 21, 2017

Boxwood | Buxus

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Boxwood is used for topiaries, and framing -- herb gardens, a perennial border, or a garden maze.  




Parkwood, Toronto, Canada

Sheridan Nursery was owned by Howard Burlingham Dunington-Grubb and Lorrie Alfreda Dunington-Grubb. They crossbred various boxwoods to provide a hardy boxwood for the Toronto, Canada climate. The Dunington-Grubbs sometimes shared projects with the renowned Edwardian landscape architect, Thomas H. Mawson. 
'Green Gem' boxwood was developed at the Sheridan Nursery and tolerates the cold temperatures of zone 4.


Table 1: Boxwood Cultivars


American boxwood B. sempervirens  'Arborescens'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Agram’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Alyce’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Anderson’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Angustifolia’
Boxwood B x  ‘Antzam’ Antarctica
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Appalachian Pyramid’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Arabeske’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Arborescens’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Argentea’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Argenteo-variegata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Asheville’
Boxwood B x  ‘Bailey’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Belvedere’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Bentley Blue’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Blauer Heinz’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Broman’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Bullata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Clembrook’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Compacta’ also 'Kingsville Dwarf'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘David’s Gold’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Dee Runk’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Denmark’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Edgar Anderson’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Elegantissima’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Elizabeth H. Inglis’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. koreana  ‘Escles’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fastigiata’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Faulkner’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fiesta’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Filigree’ or ‘Franklin’s Gem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Fleur de Lys’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Franklin’s Gem’ or ‘Filigree’
Boxwood B x  ‘Garrisoni’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Glauca’
Boxwood B x  ‘Glencoe’ Chicagoland Green
Boxwood B x  ‘Goddard College’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Golden Dream’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Golden Triumph’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Graham Blandy’  
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Grand Rapids’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Grebor’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Green Beauty’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Green Gem’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Ice’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Green Jade’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Mound’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Mountain’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Green Pillow’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Green Pillow’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Green Prince’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Green Tower’
Boxwood B x  ‘Green Velvet’   
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Gregem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Haller’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Handsworthiensis’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Handsworthii’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Harry Logan’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Helen Whiting’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Henry Shaw’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Hermann von Schrenk’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Herrenhausen’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Hollandia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Jack Randolph’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Jensen’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Jim Stauffer’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Joe Gable’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘John Baldwin’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Julia Jane’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Justin Brouwers’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Kingsville Dwarf’ also 'Compacta'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Lace’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Langley Beauty’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia Macrophylla’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia Maculata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Latifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Lawson’s Golden’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Liberty’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Marginata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Maryland’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Memorial’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Meyers’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Morris Dwarf’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Morris Midget’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Mount Bruno’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Myosotidifolia’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Nana’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Nela Park’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Nish’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Northern Emerald’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Notata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ohio’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Paramus’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Parasol’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pendula’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Pincushion’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pioneer’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ponteyi’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pride of Rochester’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Prostrata’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pullman’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pyamidalis’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Pyramidalis Hardwickensis’
Harland's boxwood B. harlandii  ‘Richard’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  ‘Rococco’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rosmarinifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rotundifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Rungeana’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Ruth Randolph’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Salicifolia’
Boxwood B x  ‘Sanders Dwarf’ 
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Schmidt’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Sentinelle’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Shandy Hall’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Silver Beauty’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Staygreen’ aka ‘Sunburst'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Sunburst' or ‘Staygreen’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Sunnyside’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Tall Boy’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Tide Hill’ 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica  ‘Trompenburg’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Truetree’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Undulifolia’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Valentine’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Vardar Valley'
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Verdant Hills’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Waterfall’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  ‘We Willie’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens ‘Welleri’
Boxwood B x  ‘Willowwood’
Boxwood B x  ‘Wilson’
Chinese boxwood B. sinica  var. insularis  ‘Winter Beauty’
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  var. japonica   ‘Winter Gem’
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens var. insularis  ‘Wintergreen’
Boxwood B x  'Balearica 
Little leaf or Japanese boxwood B. microphylla  'Bert Chandler’
Boxwood B x  'Bodinieri
Boxwood B x  'Conroe' '
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens 'Myrtifolia’
Boxwood B x  'North Star'
Harland's boxwood B. harlandii
Henry's Boxwood B. henryi
Common or European boxwood B. sempervirens
Chinese boxwood B. sinica 
Himalayan box B. wallichiana








Collections of boxwood can be found at the following:
National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

JC Raulston Arboretum
Royal Horticulture Society
Middleton Place in Charleston, visited by André Michaux in 1786

Society
The American Boxwood Society

Growers
Saunders Brothers

Additional Resources:
Boxwood Handbook: A Practical Guide to Knowing and Growing Boxwood (3rd Edition) by Lynn R. Batdorf







Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Wednesday, December 21, 2016

A Spring Snowflake for Winter Solstice

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"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden...But though an old man, I am but a young gardener." TJ


Certainly, for those gardeners dreaming of spring and gardening season, a spring snowflake with this dreamy effect reflects our anticipation. Hope, for the day we say, "good-bye snow, hello snowflake".



spring snowflake leucojum vernum BOTANICAL PLATE

FROM
'deutschlands flora in abbidungenS' 
Jackob (1771-1848) and John sturm (1742-1793)
1796
Source: Biolib
                                                            

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Tuesday, December 20, 2016

My Winter Fennel

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Fennel with umbrella-shaped, summer flowers

Fennel loves our winter climate. I grow it in our backyard  in a somewhat protected area. I participated in a class at Central Market to expand my repertoire of salad offerings. So, having never used fresh fennel, I was intrigued. Fennel is a member of the family Apiaceae, which also includes dill, cumin, coriander, caraway and parsley. It is grown for its feathery foliage, which is used fresh; for its bulbous root and stalks, which can be used raw or cooked; and for its dried seeds, which are used to flavor savory Mediterranean dishes.
After reading a herbal break down on fennel one would begin to believe it is a medicinal miracle food. I tend to serve a broad spectrum of seasonal vegetables with herbs with a philosophy of balance with an assortment for a healthy diet.









Below is a 16th century botanical plate found in "Discourses", a book compiled by Mattioli. It has a fascinating history. Initially, belonging to a convent in Casteldurante. it now resides in the Alessandrina Library of Rome where it currently holds a very specific shelf tag of, Rari 278.

fennel botanical Plate

from
'discourses on materia medica of dioscorides' 
pietro andrea mattioli (1501-1577)
venice 1568
                                                            

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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Identifying Vines

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Grape Family 

Vine I


FINALLY! The identification for this vine has been very difficult. It is not aggressive in my garden but it is persistent.  
Underside of leaf





At first I thought it might be western poison-oak or fragrant sumac Rhus aromatica based on the leaf shape. The leaf is waxy and has a strong peppery scent reminiscent of roasted sesame oil. Thanks to a persistent “image search,”  I believe it to be Cissus trifoliata. I found it at, Sheryl Smith Rogers’  Window on a Texas Wildscape blog. She says,"Sorrelvine, cow-itch vine (Cissus trifoliate), is a member of the grape family. According to Wildflowers, Trees, and Shrubs of Texas, it can cause contact dermatitis in some individuals."
My botanical reference book does not include this vine under the scientific or common name.

 Cow-itch vine 
Leaf, tendrils, vine, and root structure

Further research at the National Gardening Association revealed the, “The scent of the leaf is described as maloderous It appears to grow in Austin and San Antonio.  I have never experienced skin allergies from trimming the vine. Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center also gave further verification.

Detail of root structure and tendrils

Grape Family 

Vine II

Grape Family
Virginia creeper

virginia creeper

Virginia creeper Parthenocissus quinquefolia Grape Family Vitaceae



Grape Family 

Vine III

 mustang Grape Vine



Ginseng Family

Vine III

Ginseng family
English Ivy, Hedera Helix


Moonseed Family

Vine IV

Moonseed family

Carolina coralbead, Carolina snailseed,  Carolina moonseed, Carolina red berried moonseed, red berried moonseed. Cocculus carolinus.


This vine is first spread by birds depositing seeds and then the very aggressive vine spreads through an highly efficient underground roots system. 


Carolina snailseed 

cocculus carolinus

leaf and flower detail

 

This leaf might be Carolina moonseed, also











Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Saturday, November 26, 2016

Bird of Paradise

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Strelitzia is native to South Africa.




Bird of paradise





strelizia
a view on the knowie River, South Africa
Maryanne north painting, kew gardens
source: plant illustrations




STReLIZIA reginae
p j redoute
Missouri botanical garden
SOURCE: PLANT ILLUSTRATIONS



















rassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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Friday, November 25, 2016

Two Autumn Crocus

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I. Meadow Saffron Autumn crocus, Meadow saffron 

Colchicum autumnale 

colchicaceae family




COLCHICUM AUTUMNALE 

Flora von Deutschland, Osterreich und der Schweiz

Otto Wilhelm Thome 1885, gera, germany


Meadow saffron and saffron crocus are both autumn flowering crocus, but of differing families. We get the saffron used in cooking from saffron crocus (crocus sativus) 



II. Saffron crocus




Saffron crocus

Crocus sativus 

Iridaceae family

Kohler's Medizinal Pflanz

 Franz Eugen Kohler, 1897


















Grassroots Horticulture
2006-2016
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